DC football coach on how gun violence has impacted his team

Washington, D.C., Woodland Tigers’ football coach Steve Sanders discusses the epidemic of gun violence and how it is literally killing his players.
3:12 | 08/23/19

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Transcript for DC football coach on how gun violence has impacted his team
As the mayor just said gun violence is much more the mass shootings an epidemic in many cities across the country including right here in Washington DC that whole. His dad just as horrific as what we saw. But in El Paso in Dayton are Serena Marshall caught up with if high school football coach here in the nation's capital who told us that his 2001 football team. Only has five players remain five players living. All of the others killed by gun violence a stunning figure and he told Serena Marshall that he worries about his 2019 team. What's in store for them. Football and funeral two words that shouldn't be synonymous. For coach Steve standards are. When they're frills so many. Young people. Use. Getting killed for no reasons us was them. For more than thirty years he's volunteered his time coaching drilling and mentoring. Young boys in southeast DC. Friends live. Well. Yeah. An area plagued by violence and guns. Right what is going lol. You know why. He's. Squarely and thirteen year old's current. For many of those years funerals have become an all too familiar part of the game. Eighteen years ago his team to woodland tigers had nineteen players. Only nine made it to adulthood. One of them at a mad men remembers that was years. It hurt. So bay it does seem like close friends that you grow way and it light what these so young and it was the. Coach Steve fearful his current team faces the same future this is in coach gunned down in a drive by the motive unclear. And cutting just days after tigers defensive end Ron Brown shot over a dispute from selling cookies and water. He was only eleven. There are no single bunch of lonely hole in the car. For the parents it's the field that provides cover from that violence. Might feel an. Ideal want. The coach like so many Americans want in the politicians. Located just across the bridge to make changes. Are angry and frustrated. A borrow. From where there and leave. It's gotten data beamed up. Until they do he hopes this teen can help guide the mountains. The strength to keep doing you're actually here when it's warm home. Thank god. For saving me to do. A sentiment echoed even eighteen years later. But that same rate they show me so much it made me care about life so much they kind of show me away. Bears this cesspool. It's the you found a way out. Coach Sanders said one way he believes the gun problem can be solved is by investing in the community is programs like his when fully funded isn't just providing coaching. And also offers tutoring and feel traps DeVon. Writer thanks to you sir in a Marshall for that.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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