Ricky Gervais on what life was like before he hit it big

Comedian and host of "Deadly Sirius" podcast shares about his life before his breakout role in the original British sitcom "The Office."
5:30 | 07/17/19

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Transcript for Ricky Gervais on what life was like before he hit it big
in the -- no. Like a toddler. We all saw these age versions of ourselves from the faceapp earlier. Apparently they wanted to irritate you as well. So they have done one of you. I think you look handsome. I'm happy with that. Distinguished. You look the same. Still happy. Still happy there. You look good. I don't know if that's meant to be, but I doubt I'll be that in shape whenever that's meant to be. Looks good. That's quite flattering. I like that. Do you know how many years it's supposed to be? Is it 40? Old. Just old. Old. I'm aging like a bad banana in that thing, so don't worry. I feel lucky to be alive now, so that's something to look forward to. You have had so much success since "The office" premiered, 18 years ago this month by the way. You rose to fame as David brant on that show, and you reached fame at the age of 40. Yeah. I started -- I think I filmed that about yeah. 39, 40. 40. That's considered a late I suppose I had a whole life. I think I tried to be a pop star, and I failed miserably. Not miserably. But it was fun. It was fun failing. Yes. At 21, 22, and then I got a normal job in an office, and so it -- it turned out well, but I wasn't trying. You sort of fall into these things, and you sort of grab a Yeah. It was good, and I remember when I was -- I meant Jane in college, and so through my 20s, we had no money at all, and we lived in an apartment that was so tiny, right? It just had a bed. I could reach -- I could open the fridge from the bed, and there was the sink. There was no toilet. It was in the building, a shed. I had to go outside and go up two flights of stairs. So at night, I wouldn't go outside. I would just pop to the sink. That's right. For a wee. Convenience. Convenience, right? I remember Jane in her sleepy haze one night going, oh, at least take the dishes out first. You're too funny. She hit the jackpot. She did. What about this show you have on Sirius radio which is a big, big hit? It's a podcast. It's radio, but they call it a podcast. I honestly don't know why it's a hit. You won a best regular comedy program. I won an award and everything. I don't know who listens. It's me and a couple of idiots trying to talk about the big issues. It's very good because I listened yesterday. Well, you would say that because it's -- It's good. It's like this show, isn't it? But worse. Think of that. I'm afraid. It's less professional than this show. That's pretty bad. If we ever did a podcast, we would be in more trouble than we are now. You would be perfect for it. That's why we don't do it. You would definitely say the wrong thing. You would be apologizing in the press -- Every day. I don't. I just -- You don't care. No. It's me and a few comedians, but big ones as well. Jerry seinfeld has done one, and bill burr is doing one this week. It's basically three idiots talking for an hour, and it goes on Pandora for a podcast. You are welcome. We'll do a special. We'll do a "View" special. We won't get invited back. You have a Netflix show called "After life," and your character Tony is grieving the loss of his wife. I have spoken about grief, and it's glioblastoma awareness day. We all handle it in different Tony obviously has, and do you relate to this character in any way? I do, and I have never had a reaction like it, and people have come up and said they are grieving. You don't normally say that to a I love the fact that's my connection. I really identify with Tony because we have to bite our tongues all the day -- all the time. I mustn't say that. We wish we could, whereas Tony has nothing to lose. He says what we wish we could all say. I do. I'm annoyed at things, and there is a scene where Tony is annoyed and somebody crisps loudly. I can't stand that. It annoys me. It's horrible. I was in a restaurant in San Francisco, and the waiter kept doing this. Oh my god. I was going mental. I was going -- I know. Every tame he did it, my head was going to explode. On the plane a couple of weeks ago coming over, there is a guy before we took off. He kept yawning going -- and I made sure there wasn't something wrong with him, and then after the 15th time, and then I said, excuse me. Could you do the yawn without all the noises after? He went, oh. I had to sit there for six hours. That's the problem. You can't say anything. I want people to just act -- I want the police to come in and say, stop shuffling your feet. Stop chewing too loudly.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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